Hull Public Health 

The Deep, Hull The Guildhall, Hull King William Statue, Market Place, Hull City Hall, Hull Spurn Lightship, The Marina, Hull

 

 


Young People Health and Lifestyle Surveys

In order to have an impact on reducing inequity in health and preventing disease rather than just treating disease, it is necessary to influence people's attitudes and behaviours towards health, and in order to accomplish this it is necessary to have knowledge about health-related attitudes and behaviours and people's perceptions towards their health, as well as the prevalence of risk factors, such as smoking, and prevalence of diseases and medical conditions.

National data are available for some health and lifestyle issues from surveys such as the Health Survey for England, but since this covers the whole of England, relatively few people within the local area participate in the survey. However, such data can be used to compare local data with national data, although in many cases different questions and response categories, and differences in the survey designs, mean that it is not straightforward to compare the results directly.

Local prevalence estimates and attitudes to health can be obtained from the local Health and Lifestyle Surveys involving young people attending secondary schools in Hull.

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2012 Young People Health and Lifestyle Survey

A Health and Lifestyle Survey was undertaken among young people aged 11-16 years (school years 7-11) within Hull with completion the fieldwork during around Easter 2012. All but one of Hull's 14 secondary schools agreed to participate, as did three pupil referral units, one special school as well as one of the local independent (private) schools. Questionnaires from 3,802 pupils were included in the analysis representing just over one in every four young people in Hull of secondary school age. A reduced version of the questionnaire, without questions on sexual health and drug use, was available for schools, if required. The survey was broadly representative of young people in the city, although older pupils were under-represented (partly due to the timing of the survey and examinations). Five focus groups were held with different year groups from five schools across the city. Each group lasted the length of one lesson (approx. 45 – 50 minutes) and was agreed and arranged in advance with the school representative that had assisted in the administration of the questionnaire. Eight pupils were selected by the school at random to attend each group; it was emphasised that the pupils selected should be representative of the year group. In-depth interviews were also conducted with health professionals.

The following documents are available:

Young People Health and Lifestyle Survey 2012 Main Report (205 pages)
Young People Health and Lifestyle Survey 2012 Summary (24 pages)
Young People Health and Lifestyle Survey 2012 Questionnaire (21 pages)
Young People Health and Lifestyle Survey 2012 Reflector Report (34 pages)

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2008-09 Young People Health and Lifestyle Survey

A Health and Lifestyle Survey was completed among young people aged 11-16 years (school years 7-11) within Hull with fieldwork completed during the period November 2008 to February 2009. Thirteen of the fourteen schools agreed to participate as well as a further three Pupil Referral Units (PRUs). St Mary's school did not agree to take part, which takes pupils from across the city. Each participating school was given a quota and asked to select whole classes to survey to fulfil that quota so that questionnaires were completed for all school years. On the whole, the survey was undertaken during Personal, Social and Health Education (PSHE) classes which are generally not selected in relation to ability and future educational attainment. The target of 3,000 completed questionnaires was not quite achieved as 2,928 completed questionnaires were obtained. Reflector groups were also held with the aim of understanding the underlying opinions and attitudes in relation to smoking, diet, exercise, obesity, alcohol and drugs. Two groups were conducted in two schools across all school years, and four further groups were held with those aged 16-18 years.

The following documents are available:

Young People Health and Lifestyle Survey 2008-09 Main Report (183 pages)
Young People Health and Lifestyle Survey 2008-09 Diet Report (15 pages)
Young People Health and Lifestyle Survey 2008-09 Questionnaire (26 pages)
Young People Health and Lifestyle Survey 2008-09 Reflector Report (24 pages)

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2002 Young People Health and Lifestyle Survey

A Health and Lifestyle Survey was completed among young people aged 11-15 years (school years 7-10). Twenty one out of the 36 schools within Hull and East Riding of Yorkshire participated. Schools were asked to survey two classes within each of the school years 7-10. Schools selected which classes they surveyed and this could have been within classes selected by ability and future educational attainment, so the young people were not necessarily representative of Hull secondary school pupils. A total of 1,432 young people participated in Hull.

The following documents are available:

Young People Health and Lifestyle Survey 2002 Main Report (96 pages)
Young People Health and Lifestyle Survey 2002 Questionnaire (12 pages)

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Young People Resilience Survey

Resilience concerns the ability to 'bounce back' from adversity. Resilience can apply to individuals, families and communities. Greater resilience has the potential to realise benefits in terms of physical and mental wellbeing for children.

A Social Exclusion Task Force review in 2007 established resilience building as part of universal service provision. In the same year in its Children's Plan, the Department for Children, Schools and Families (DCSF) now the Department of Education (DE) emphasised the importance of building resilience. The need to foster social and emotional skills in children and young adults was highlighted in Aiming High for Young People: A Ten Year Strategy For Positive Activities.

Children's resilience is difficult to measure. However, a wide range of factors that tend to be grouped into three levels have been identified:

Individual or internal, e.g. intelligence, gender
Family, e.g. quality of relationships, cohesion
Community or society, e.g. level of social support

Local data on resilience were collected in a survey among year 5 and year 8 pupils in Hull in 2011.

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2011 Young People Resilience Survey

A resilience survey was undertaken among young people aged 9-10 years (school year 5) and aged 12-13 years (school year 8) within Hull during 2011. Fouteen primary schools and seven secodary schools participated in the survey providing a broadly representative sample of 1,094 Hull pupils of these ages. A detailed questionnaire was used, with questions covering the three areas outlined above, as well as the 14 questions of The Resilience Scale™.

The following document is available:

Young People Resilience Survey 2011 Main Report (157 pages)

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Other Surveys

You might also be interested in details of the Adult Health and Lifestyle Surveys, Social Capital Surveys and Qualitative Research.

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