Hull Public Health 

The Deep, Hull The Guildhall, Hull King William Statue, Market Place, Hull City Hall, Hull Spurn Lightship, The Marina, Hull

 

 

Physical Activity

Four specific reports have been produced on physical activity as follows:

Physical Activity, Diet and Obesity Report 2014 (37 pages)
Obesity, Physical Activity and Diet Summary 2014 (3 pages)
Diet and Exercise Report 2013 (24 pages)
Obesity and Exercise Report 2007 (71 pages)
Hull JSNA Toolkit: Physical Activity (155 pages)

The 2014 report and summary detail findings relating to exercise (and diet) from the Adult Health and Lifestyle Survey 2014, with additional information from the qualitative work undertaken after previous health and lifestyle surveys of adults and young people, further details of which can be found here. Also included are local analyseis of the relevant Public Health Outcome Framework indicators, further details of which may be found in the Public Health Outcomes Framework Main Report (to open this report on a particular PHOF indicator, click here)

The 2013 report details findings relating to exercise (and diet) from the Hull's Adult Health and Lifestyle Survey 2011-12 and Hull's Young People Health and Lifestyle Survey 2012, and information on Hull's physical activity strategy. The total number of adults (aged 16+ years) in Hull who have a poor diet and insufficient exercise is also estimated based on population estimates and the prevalence of the risk factor in the surveys.

The 2007 report details the findings relating to exercise from the Hull's Adult Health and Lifestyle Survey 2007. The 'risk' of insufficient exercise is also examined in statistical modelling to determine which other factors are associated with low levels of exercise with the aim of targeting those individuals in order to improve their levels of exercise.

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Definitions

The definitions used to classify physical activity levels and details of the national recommendations are given in the individual reports, but also within Hull JSNA Toolkit: Exercise and Glossary.

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Asset Approach

The strategy must emphasise that providing more services is insufficient on its own to ensure an increase in physical activity. An assets based approach should be utilised to complement existing service provision and inform future development. Some of the most powerful influences on behaviour change are family and neighbours, people seen as part of the local community. Using Health Trainers, Health Champions recruited from within the communities themselves can help to support people who want to make changes to their lives to improve levels of exercise. Through becoming more empowered as individuals these people then become more engaged in their community and build better social networks. People can help each other and act together to make healthy choices easier for the whole community, making activities self sustaining. This is the aim of the many strands of the Hearty Lives initiative, promoting health walks, sports schemes, dance clubs, workplace activities, education in schools, empowering individuals and communities to expand and continue the work to make it self-sustaining after the British Heart Foundation funding has ceased.

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Attitudes to Health (Including Physical Activity)

Information about the attitudes to health which included physical activity are summarised in Hull JSNA Toolkit: Exercise. The information comes from reflector / focus groups undertaken after the Health and Lifestyle Surveys of adults and young people:

Health and Lifestyle Survey 2007 Reflector Report
Young People Health and Lifestyle Survey 2008-09 Reflector Report

Further information on whether adults feel as if doing more exercise would improve their health is given in the JSNA Toolkit as well as the Social Capital Survey 2009 Main Report.

Further information is available in the Attitudes to Health Survey 2007 completed among people aged 40-60 years.

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Evaluation of Physical Activity Community Groups

Details of the evaluation of local exercise programmes are given within Hull JSNA Toolkit: Exercise.

Factors Predicting Physical Activity

Factors which predict physical activity levels are given in the Obesity and Exercise Report 2007.

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Prevalence

Levels of physical activity were collected in the majority of the surveys. The prevalence of physical activity has generally been presented as:

i) Five or more 30+ minute sessions of moderate or vigorous exercise per week
ii) Fewer than five 30+ minute sessions of moderate or vigorous exercise per week
iii) Light exercise only
iv) Never exercises

Prevalence estimates are given in the following reports:

Young People Health and Lifestyle Survey 2012 Main Report
Young People Health and Lifestyle Survey 2008-09 Main Report
Young People Health and Lifestyle Survey 2002 Main Report
Adult Health and Lifestyle Survey 2014 Main Report
Adult Health and Lifestyle Survey 2011-12 Main Report
BME Health and Lifestyle Survey 2011-12 Main Report
Adult Health and Lifestyle Survey 2009 Main Report
Veteran Health and Lifestyle Survey 2009 Main Report
Adult Health and Lifestyle Survey 2007 Main Report
BME Health and Lifestyle Survey 2007 Main Report
Gypsy and Traveller Health and Lifestyle Survey 2007 Main Report

The prevalence was also given in relation to age and gender, among adults and young people is given in the JSNA and Hull JSNA Toolkit: Exercise with the latter also examining physical activity in relation to deprivation and employment status.

The national guidelines have changed recently (details within Glossary), but the local surveys have continued to ask about levels of physical activity in sessions of 30 or more minutes rather than 10 minutes or more. This means that the local trends can be compared over time, albeit slight changes to the questionnaires may have influenced the responses.

The prevalence of physically active and inactive adults are indicators within Public Health Outcomes Framework and further analysis is given within the Public Health Outcomes Framework Main Report (to open this report on a particular PHOF indicator, click here) and Public Health Outcomes Framework Summary.

The prevalence was also examined at ward level within the following documents:

JSNA Hull Atlas
Adult Health and Lifestyle Survey 2014 Main Report
Adult Health and Lifestyle Survey 2011-12 Main Report
Hull's Ward Profiles 2013
Hull's Ward Profiles 2009

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Reasons for Not Exercising

Reasons for not exercising are given in the follwing reports from the 2003 Adult Health and Lifestyle Survey:

Adult Health and Lifestyle Survey 2003 Main Report
Adult Health and Lifestyle Survey 2003 Eastern Hull Tables
Adult Health and Lifestyle Survey 2003 West Hull Tables

Subsequent surveys did not ask survey respondents this question.

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Risk Factor

Information relating to physical activity as a risk factor is given in Hull JSNA Toolkit: Exercise, the Physical Activity, Diet and Obesity Report 2014, the Obesity, Physical Activity and Diet summary 2014 and the Diet and Exercise Report 2013.

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Social Marketing

Considerable Social Marketing work has been undertaken examining behaviour and attitudes to physical activity in Hull with the aim of providing more relevant information to help people increase physical activity. Further work has been completed within reflector groups following some of the local surveys af adults and young people, as well as the Attitudes to Health Survey 2007. The following reports include information on attitudes to physical activity:

Attitudes to Health Survey 2007
Adult Health and Lifestyle Survey 2007 Reflector Report
Young People Health and Lifestyle Survey 2012 Reflector Report
Young People Health and Lifestyle Survey 2008-09 Reflector Report

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Strategy

More information on the physical activity strategy is given within the Diet and Exercise Report 2013.

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